UNESCO Chair Global Health and Education Health Education, Prevention, Health Promotion, Children and Young People
 

An intersectoral dynamic for adolescent health – Greek launch event UNESCO Chair

Launch of the second mandate of the UNESCO Chair in Athens, Greece

Professor Artemis Tsitsika of the Kapodistrian University of Athens: “The UNESCO Chair and WHO Collaborating Center on Global Health & Education, in collaboration with WHO regional office for Europe, UNESCO IITE, the Medical School of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (N.K.U.A.), the Ionian University and other national and scientific organisations have successfully realized a significant event in Athens – Greece. The event took place on Tuesday April 16th, 2024 in the Auditorium of “P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital. The theme of the event was on advocacy for adolescent health, highlighting mental health and digital citizenship. The event was supported by LIFELINE Hellas.

During the launch, the Adolescent Health Unit (A.H.U.) of the Second Dpt of Pediatrics of the N.K.U.A. in “P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital has been awarded as a “youth friendly” service promoting digital literacy and implementing social emotional empowerment in collaboration with UNESCO IITE.  

More than ever before, health and education have become major social issues. In this post-crisis period, societies are facing huge challenges that call for a collective, interdisciplinary, innovative and international response, while being rooted in the local communities.” said Professor Didier Jourdan.

For more information about the event and the presentations please visit the dedicated webpage.

* The Adolescent Health Unit (A.H.U.) of the Second Dpt of Pediatrics of the N.K.U.A. in “P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital has been operating since 2006 and has supported more than 10.000 adolescents facing developmental issues, eating disorders, learning disorders, internet addiction, bullying, disabilities, sexual health problems etc.  In 2018 the A.H.U. was acknowledged as “good” practice functioning as a “youth friendly” service, based on the WHO guidelines.